San Diego Pittie Parents is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.
EIN #47-4448060

Info@SDPittieParents.org

Follow us on:

  • Meetup White
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

© 2015 by San Diego Pittie Parents.

Emergency Dog Rescue CAR KIT

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2016

     For our friends who may not consider themselves “Crazy Dog People” don’t fret! We won’t hold that against you BOL! But just because you aren’t involved in dog rescue doesn’t mean you can’t save a life on any given day. No one PLANS to find a stray dog when they’re running errands, but life happens, and having a few simple items handy in your car can mean the difference between life-and-death for a stray dog...


“No one plans to find a stray, it just happens. Being prepared can
mean the difference between life and death for a stray animal.”

EMERGENCY DOG RESCUE CAR KIT (using items from around the house):
 

  1. BOTTLED WATER - strays can be thirsty, some haven’t drunken for days and living in San Diego surrounded by desert, it’s never a bad idea to have an extra water jug in the car.
     

  2. WATER BOWL - how else do you plan to give water to the dog?
     

  3. LEASHES - our favorite go-to is the SLIP LEASH, it adjusts to any size dog and easy to use. In a pinch slip leads can even be used as a lasso to catch a dog who may not be so willing to come near you..
     

  4. CARABINERS - no we don’t expect you to scale 10-ft walls and repel off cliffs, but these inexpensive gadgets will secure a leash to your car. When you do get your hands on a stray and loaded into the car, it’s important to exercise safe driving with an unknown animal, plus you won’t have to worry about them jumping out the window or trying to sit in the front seat when you’re focusing on the road.
     

  5. FREE SAMPE BAGS of DOG FOOD - you can find these at most pet stores as free giveaways when brands are trying to sell new product. Most people throw these away but there are you have TWO USEFUL OPTIONS: (1) Use a bag to entice a hungry dog (sealed to stay fresh and just enough for one stray) or (2) give them out to the homeless you see on the streets with dogs (BONUS OPTION!)
     

  6. TOWLS -OR- BLANKETS - many strays are filthy and with them comes fleas, dirt, oil and who knows what?! Having a gently used towel or blanket isn’t just to keep your car from getting dirty, it may save a dog! Smaller breeds tend to be fearful of strangers (ever met a chihuahua who didn’t want to bite you?) so if you have the opportunity to corner them, throwing a towel or blanket over them will increase your odds of catching these little buggers and keeping your fingers safe from bites in the process! This works for larger dogs too depending on the situation.
     

  7. SQUEAKY TOYS & TENNIS BALLS - some strays aren’t lost at all. In fact, there’s always a chance you’ve run across a neighborhood dog who got bored and escaped an unsupervised yard. To them THIS IS A GAME! And an unsuspecting stranger willing to run with them is just a game of “Catch Me If You Can”... having an enticing toy (squeaky toys can help keep dogs focused on you because of their high-pitched sound) and tennis balls may be fun enough for a dog to approach you instead of running away.
     

  8. POOP BAGS & DISINFECTANT WIPES - the glorious world of rescue isn’t always pretty, in fact it’s rather dirty. Combined with a dog in “fight or flight” mode, you may have an accidental bowel movement in the car when transporting a dog to the closest rescue shelter. There’s nothing wrong with having cleaning supplies handy when this happens, and you’ll be glad you did!
     

     And for some last minute helpful tips, when finding a stray dog always check for a collar & ID tag, otherwise you may be able to take him/her to the nearest vet to be scanned for a microchip. Post pictures of the dog online, in Facebook groups, Lost & Found websites, and neighborhood apps, but always remember YOU MAY NOT KEEP A LOST DOG just because you found it. It is illegal to harbor a lost pet without reporting to the authorities and in most cases, must relinquish the dog to the closest Animal Shelter, Humane Society, or Department of Animals Services for the required 72-hours holding period. If you are considering adopting the dog once the holding period is over and they have not been blamed, then you’re free to take home you new best friend!
 

Sincerely,
SDPP Staff

Email: info@sdpittieparents.org